The theme of outsiders in the novel of mice and men by john steinbeck

Unemployment was high at this time and men had to move around a lot looking for work, which meant they were never in one place long enough to form any relationships, so this was a very lonely existence.

The theme of outsiders in the novel of mice and men by john steinbeck

The novel portrays this idea of loneliness throughout John Steinbeck's stimulating and exciting novel. There are several clearly identified themes running through the novel.

The loyalty and friendship which exists between two men, George and Lennie, and the hostile environment of America during the American Depression.

Steinbeck raises questions in the mind of the reader that the novel would be based on loneliness. The first line read "A few miles south of Soledad". This is a clever idea by Steinbeck as "Soledad" means loneliness in Spanish. The setting of Steinbeck's novel is very important because the date when the novel took place was inaround the time New York Wall Street stock market collapsed, resulting in the dollar becoming worthless.

Unemployment was high at this time and men had to move around a lot looking for work, which meant they were never in one place long enough to form any relationships, so this was a very lonely existence.

Steinbeck shaped the ranch where George Milton and Lennie Small worked in as an isolated and primitive place.

What is the theme of John Steinbeck's novel Of Mice and Men? | eNotes

Steinbeck uses his personal experience as a ranch worker to describe how the working men at the ranch felt in the novel. George says that "ranch workers are the loneliest people in the world and don't belong nowhere". Steinbeck also portrays loneliness through characterisation.

He uses sexism, racism and ageism to get his message across. One example of this is when George meets the old, decaying Candy and his antiquated dog, he tells him about the "black" man called Crooks. Candy stated to the inarticulate George "give the Stable Buck hell.

Ya see the stable buck's a nigger". This was typical of 's America as black people were thought of as inferior to white people. This suggests that Crooks was friendless. He has his "own bunk in a separate nigger room" and "he scattered personal possessions around the floor; for being alone he could leave things about".

The theme of outsiders in the novel of mice and men by john steinbeck

Crooks is obviously suffering from racial discrimination as he is the only black man on the ranch and is not allowed in the bunkroom with the other men because of his colour.

He therefore, had a very lonely existence. Steinbeck also uses Candy to portray loneliness.

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The disconsolate Candy becomes lonely after his beloved dog was shot. Candy feels dejected as he says "I wish somebody would shoot me when I become useless". This proves that Steinbeck describes Candy as lonely character.

Perhaps the loneliest character, which Steinbeck creates in the novel, is Curly's wife.Free Essay: ‘Of Mice and Men’ is a novel written by John Steinbeck.

The novel is set in the s, where the Great Depression years occurred and had a huge. Of Mice and Men was Steinbeck's seventh novel.

The theme of outsiders in the novel of mice and men by john steinbeck

Though he had achieved critical and popular success with his two preceding novels, Tortilla Flat () and In Dubious Battle (), Of Mice and Men was an instant success on another level altogether.

- The Theme of Loneliness in John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men "Of Mice and Men" is a skillful novel, which deals with the theme of `outsiders', that is, individuals who do not fit into the mainstream of society.

Get an answer for 'Explore the significance of outsiders in the novel 'Of Mice and Men'; consider the context of the novel and provide quotes in support of the significance.' and find homework. The novel ‘Of Mice and Men’, written by John Steinbeck is a truly fascinating novel based upon the theme of dreams.

This novel was published in , which was towards the end of ‘The Great Depression’ that hit the United States.

Expert Answers They hope to one day attain the dream of settling down on their own piece of land. Lennie's part of the dream is merely to tend and pet rabbits on the farm, as he loves touching soft animals, although he always kills them.

In Of Mice and Men, Steinbeck made a nationwide problem human and in doing so, he created characters who continue to both move and disturb. Bibliography: Cynthia Burkhead, Student Companion to John Steinbeck, .

Of Mice and Men - Setting | Steinbeck in the Schools | San Jose State University